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Showing: 31-40 results of 58153

by Army
U.S. Army First Aid Manual offers skills and knowledge necessary for many life-threatening situations, with an emphasis on treating oneself and aiding others—of use to soldiers in the field, to outdoorsmen, or to anyone who may find themselves in a dangerous situation without a medical professional on-hand. This is the official manual for treating every type of injury and affliction in the field. Covering a broad range of topics in... more...

When Germany invaded the Soviet Union in the summer of 1941, Stalin requested help from the Western Allies. The result was the Arctic Convoys--the opening of a sea route from Britain to Northern Russia, used to supply the Soviets with vitally-needed war materials. This route passed close to German-occupied Norway, and so in January 1942 the newly-completed battleship Tirpitz--sister of the Bismarck--was sent there, to form the core of... more...

The discovery of a powerful memory technique used by our Neolithic ancestors in their monumental memory places―and how we can use their secrets to train our own minds In ancient, pre-literate cultures across the globe, tribal elders had encyclopedic memories. They could name all the animals and plants across a landscape, identify the stars in the sky, and recite the history of their people. Yet today, most of us struggle to memorize more than... more...

The magnificent and definitive history of the Eternal City, narrated by a master historian. Why does Rome continue to exert a hold on our imagination? How did the "Caput mundi" come to play such a critical role in the development of Western civilization? Ferdinand Addis addresses these questions by tracing the history of the "Eternal City" told through the dramatic key moments in its history: from the mythic founding of Rome in 753 BC, via such... more...

This Encyclopedia is designed to accumulate and systematize our knowledge about the unique natural water areas - the Barents, White and Kara seas, their wealth, the events that took place on its waters and shores, and the remarkable people whose lives were and are closely intertwined with the seas. The Encyclopedia contains about 900 terms and concepts related to the seas. It describes geographical features: rivers, lakes, straits, bays; provides... more...


When the British occupied the tiny island of Hong Kong during the First Opium War, the Chinese empire was well into its decline, while Great Britain was already in the second decade of its legendary "Imperial Century." From this collision of empires arose a city that continues to intrigue observers. Melding Chinese and Western influences, Hong Kong has long defied easy categorization. John M. Carroll's engrossing and accessible narrative explores the... more...

A humiliating military defeat by Bismarck's Germany, a brutal siege, and a bloody uprising—Paris in 1871 was a shambles, and the question loomed, "Could this extraordinary city even survive?"Mary McAuliffe takes the reader back to these perilous years following the abrupt collapse of the Second Empire and France's uncertain venture into the Third Republic. By 1900, Paris had recovered and the Belle Epoque was in full flower, but the decades between... more...

"I've always had difficulty imagining my father as a policeman. He seemed most himself in the informal setting of safari life, clothes disheveled, sometimes not shaving for days. So why did he join the Indian Police, with its rigid hierarchies and complex protocols?" Setting Sun is the story of the dying days of an empire, combined with gripping family history, in an extraordinary literary voyage across India. When a letter from an Indian historian... more...

How subtler forms of balance-of-power politics can help states achieve their goals against aggressive powers without wars or arms races At the end of the Cold War, the United States emerged as the world’s most powerful state, and then used that power to initiate wars against smaller countries in the Middle East and South Asia. According to balance‑of‑power theory—the bedrock of realism in international relations—other... more...

The Yamasee Indians are best known for their involvement in the Indian slave trade and the eighteenth-century war (1715–54) that took their name. Yet, their significance in colonial history is far larger than that. Denise I. Bossy brings together archaeologists of South Carolina and Florida with historians of the Native South, Spanish Florida, and British Carolina for the first time to answer elusive questions about the Yamasees’... more...