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Chemistry is traditionally thought to have been a masculine subject in secondary schools – one at which boys excelled and girls had limited interest. In this groundbreaking work, Marelene and Geoff Rayner-Canham reveal that from the 1820s to the 1930s chemistry teaching flourished in girls’ independent schools in Britain. This tradition tailed off before the Second World War, and a proud history was forgotten even in the schools where it had... more...

British chemistry has traditionally been depicted as a solely male endeavour. However, this perspective is untrue: the allure of chemistry has attracted women since the earliest times. Despite the barriers placed in their path, women studied academic chemistry from the 1880s onwards and made interesting or significant contributions to their fields, yet they are virtually absent from historical records.Comprising a unique set of biographies of 141 of... more...

This bestselling text gives students a less rigorous, less mathematical way of learning inorganic chemistry, using the periodic table as a context for exploring chemical properties and uncovering relationships between elements in different groups. The authors help students understand the relevance of the subject to their lives by covering both the historical development and fascinating contemporary applications of inorganic chemistry... more...

This bestselling text introduces descriptive inorganic chemistry in a less rigorous, less mathematical way.  The book uses the periodic table as basis for understanding chemical properties and uncovering relationships between elements in different groups.    Rayner-Canham and Overton’s text also familiarizes students with the historical background of inorganic chemistry as well as with its... more...